Tuesday, August 19, 2014
donut-kun:

The proper response to street harassment
Monday, August 18, 2014
breakinq:

following back tons
Monday, August 18, 2014
ejacutastic:

brother no
Monday, August 18, 2014
Monday, August 18, 2014
el-aatmik:

blu3hare:

sherlockismyholmesboy:

randomhouse:

When you see it…

it took three passes of this across my dash until I got it and want to throw my macbook out the fucking window

Are you fucking kidding me


All this aside the Dresden Files series is fucking amazing
Monday, August 18, 2014
Monday, August 18, 2014

professor-pigeon:

I googled ‘swimming pigeon’ once and I still haven’t recovered from this picture

image

(source)

Monday, August 18, 2014
Monday, August 18, 2014

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

Monday, August 18, 2014
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